Fairlane Wheels for Shooters

https://www.mcmaster.com/#2477k37/=19u9xni

 

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@TLDSB opportunity to compete in First Lego League

Copy of Google Classroom Header Template
Thanks to TLDSB Program Enhancement I am excited to announce how teachers can participate in First Lego League!

Tomorrow’s innovators practice imaginative thinking and teamwork. Guided by two or more adult Coaches, FIRST LEGO League* teams (up to 10 members, grades 4-8**) research a real-world problem such as food safety, recycling, energy, etc., and are challenged to develop a solution. They also must design, build, program a robot using LEGO MINDSTORMS®, then compete on a table-top playing field.
It all adds up to tons of fun while they learn to apply science, technology, engineering, and math concepts (STEM), plus a big dose of imagination, to solve a problem. Along their journey, they develop critical thinking and team-building skills, basic STEM applications, and even presentation skills, as they must present their solutions with a dash of creativity to judges. They also practice the Program’s Core Values, which emphasize discovery, teamwork and good sportsmanship.

What’s involved

  1. Teachers must complete this short form to sign up.  They must have the name of a second person (teacher or parent) that will be the second coach.
    https://goo.gl/forms/0x8Cn7NuMu8Qh5BL2
  2. Teachers will be contacted by November 6, 2017 if they are accepted (there are limited spots and lots of interest).
  3. December 9 teachers involved must attend the North Bay FLL tournament either as audience members or as volunteers (when selecting teachers preference will be given to teachers that signed up as volunteers – contact ndewar@stenning.com and cc Ian McTavish if you are interested in volunteering).
  4. December – May compete in the TLDSB Robofair
  5. May 2018 your registration cost will be paid for you.
  6. September – December 2018 the challenge will be released and you need to commit time to work with your team – feel free to do this as a class as there are many curriculum expectations that are met.  The mat and lego parts for the challenge will be paid for you.  December TLDSB will host an FLL tournament that your team will compete in – registration cost may need to be covered by you (we’re hoping to secure funding to cover it) at a maximum cost of $100.

We are working at funding strategies to allow your team to compete for at least two years!

About the competition

FLL is more than just robots.  At competition there are the following components:

  • Core Values (listed below)  – teams participate in a team challenge related to the core values
  • The Project – students complete a project based on the theme.  Last year Animal Allies was the theme, Riverside Public School researched how salt was used on the road to melt ice increased the number of deer that were hit by cars.  A key component of the project is for students to take action based on their research.
  • The Robot Game – students design and program a lego EV3 robot to complete a variety of missions

Hoya Robotics team 4152 is committed to supporting the new teams and will guide you every step of the way.

Core Values

We are a team.
We do the work to find solutions with guidance from our coaches and mentors.
We know our coaches and mentors don’t have all the answers; we learn together.
We honor the spirit of friendly competition.
What we discover is more important than what we win.
We share our experiences with others.
We display Gracious Professionalism® and Coopertition® in everything we do.
We have FUN!

 

* An alliance between FIRST and the LEGO® Group
** Ages 9-14 in the U.S. and Canada. Ages vary by country.

Lego #ev3 programs that are useful for FLL – turning and using the lines on the the board

Robot Setup:

Program that uses the Gyro sensor – can turn the robot and stop when the robot turns a certain angle.

 

Using the Port View to determine what value to use for a black line

Program to stop robot when it reaches a black line

Encoders

amt103-v_smlEncoders are sensors used  to track the rotations of a wheel.  In the 2017 season we used two AMT103-V sensors for our drive train.  This allowed us to score gears effectively in autonomous mode as we could determine the number of rotations of the wheels to a great deal of precision.  Mounting these encoders was a pain.

We wired the motors with 102-1504-ND connectors.  These connectors came loose a few times as they were mounted down and if we ran over a gear they could get caught.  We need to look at electrician’s putty which some other teams used.

We are looking at purchasing E4T OEM Encoders.  Ideally we would keep six or eight on hand – two for drive train and at least one for any shooting mechanism.